RWG

Pages

AuthorTopic: RWG
Electric Sheep One
Member # 3431
Profile #50
That sounds plausible. In fact, I just saw the same illusion at another museum, which gave precisely this explanation. Congratulations!

On another color-related note: one of my favorite fun facts.

The color magenta is named after the battle of Magenta, which is a town in what is now NW Italy. The color was one of the first wholly artificial dyes, and was developed that year. The main market for artificial dyes -- and in those early days it was an enormously booming market -- was women's fashion, of which Paris was, of course, the capital. So naming the new shade after one of Napoleon III's relatively few victories was a commercial tactic that paid off well.

This rather bizarre fact, that what we think of today as almost a primary color was named after an event, is just the poster child for the fascinating history of artificial dyes, which were discovered in the latter 19th century, launched the chemical industry, and changed the human world from the rather drab place it was for most of human history, into the colorful place we now take for granted.

[ Sunday, May 01, 2005 19:15: Message edited by: Student of Trinity ]

--------------------
We're not doing cool. We're doing pretty.
Posts: 3335 | Registered: Thursday, September 4 2003 07:00
By Committee
Member # 4233
Profile #51
I wonder: does color affect animals the way that it affects people? I seem to recall learning in high school psychology that colors affect moods, which was why all the rooms at school were painted in drab, dull colors - to prevent students from being rowdy.

EDIT: The baby pigeon now looks almost like an adult, with just a few wisps of baby fluff on his head. Still, though, he hasn't flown away yet... :mad:

[ Tuesday, May 03, 2005 06:29: Message edited by: andrew miller ]
Posts: 2242 | Registered: Saturday, April 10 2004 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 335
Profile Homepage #52
Possibly, but since animals perceive color differently and can't talk about it, it would take some testing to figure it out. I'm sure someone has done it.

—Alorael, who now wonders how much of color association is hard-wired and how much is societal. Sure, black may be evil and scary because stumbling around in the dark is scary, but why is blue peaceful, red passionate or angry, or yellow cheery?
Posts: 14579 | Registered: Saturday, December 1 2001 08:00
...b10010b...
Member # 869
Profile Homepage #53
quote:
Originally written by andrew miller:

I wonder: does color affect animals the way that it affects people? I seem to recall learning in high school psychology that colors affect moods, which was why all the rooms at school were painted in drab, dull colors - to prevent students from being rowdy.
Apparently, chickens exposed primarily to red light (or with red filters placed over their eyes) lay more eggs.

--------------------
The Empire Always Loses: This Time For Sure!
Posts: 9973 | Registered: Saturday, March 30 2002 08:00
By Committee
Member # 4233
Profile #54
quote:
Originally written by Thuryl:

Apparently, chickens exposed primarily to red light (or with red filters placed over their eyes) lay more eggs.
Hmm. Not that I'm going to do this, but I wonder if that would work with the pigeons on my porch?
Posts: 2242 | Registered: Saturday, April 10 2004 07:00
Electric Sheep One
Member # 3431
Profile #55
Pigeons exposed to red light will never lay eggs again, if the light is intense enough.

--------------------
We're not doing cool. We're doing pretty.
Posts: 3335 | Registered: Thursday, September 4 2003 07:00
By Committee
Member # 4233
Profile #56
quote:
Originally written by Student of Trinity:

Pigeons exposed to red light will never lay eggs again, if the light is intense enough.
I take it you mean laser intense, right? There's a correlation between daylight and hens laying eggs - they "lay off" so to speak in the winter, when there's less daylight. I imagine this may correlate with other birds as well.

[ Thursday, May 05, 2005 08:36: Message edited by: andrew miller ]
Posts: 2242 | Registered: Saturday, April 10 2004 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 2984
Profile Homepage #57
quote:
Originally written by Student of Trinity:

Pigeons exposed to red light will never lay eggs again, if the light is intense enough.
The same applies to any other bird, though.

--------------------
EncyclopaediaArchivesMembersRSS [Topic / Forum] • BlogPolarisNaNoWriMo
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair.
I have a love of woodwind instruments.
Posts: 8752 | Registered: Wednesday, May 14 2003 07:00
Electric Sheep One
Member # 3431
Profile #58
Maybe not a cardinal.

--------------------
We're not doing cool. We're doing pretty.
Posts: 3335 | Registered: Thursday, September 4 2003 07:00
By Committee
Member # 4233
Profile #59
The pigeon has finally taken wing. It was kind of fun to watch him make his first few small flights, but I'm glad he's gone.

Anyone know a good way to remove bird crap from concrete?
Posts: 2242 | Registered: Saturday, April 10 2004 07:00
Shaper
Member # 73
Profile #60
quote:
Originally written by Student of Trinity:

Maybe not a cardinal.
Female cardinals are brown.
IMAGE(http://www.littlemesahouse.com/copyright_applies_to_all_images/Birds/Female%20Cardinal2.jpg)
However, even if they were red, I'm pretty sure a high-powered laser would prevent them from laying eggs no less easily than with any other bird.

--------------------
My Myspace, with some of my audial and visual art
The Lyceum - The Headquarters of the Blades designing community
The Louvre - The Blades of Avernum graphics database
Alexandria - The Blades of Exile Scenario database
BoE Webring - Self explanatory
Polaris - Free porn here
Odd Todd - Fun for the unemployed (and everyone else too)
They Might Be Giants - Four websites for one of the greatest bands in existance
--------------------
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Posts: 2957 | Registered: Thursday, October 4 2001 07:00
Electric Sheep One
Member # 3431
Profile #61
Hmmm, maybe a brown laser? (Of course there is no single brown laser because brown is a tertiary color that needs at least three different frequencies, but you could align three lasers.)

I'm so used to physics exams right now, I automatically interpret 'cardinal' as 'perfectly reflective of red light'. But even if the cardinal didn't absorb any light, reflecting it would involve momentum transfer, which could still blast the bird to fluff if the beam were strong enough. On the other hand, at those strengths linear optics is toast, and even a perfectly red object would probably absorb a lot.

So, yeah: even ideal cardinals aren't safe from ultimate lasers. I hope we've all learned something from this: ultrapowerful laser beams are bad news.

Here's another bizarre fact about light: at ultrahigh frequencies, light becomes opaque to light. Corrections to Maxwell's equations, from quantum electrodynamics, introduce frequency-dependent nonlinearity that should theoretically produce 'light-by-light scattering'.
I don't believe the effect has yet been observed, but I've heard it used as a constraint on models for the source of gamma ray bursts.

--------------------
We're not doing cool. We're doing pretty.
Posts: 3335 | Registered: Thursday, September 4 2003 07:00
Master
Member # 1046
Profile Homepage #62
quote:
Originally written by andrew miller:

The pigeon has finally taken wing. It was kind of fun to watch him make his first few small flights, but I'm glad he's gone.

Anyone know a good way to remove bird crap from concrete?

Hose it down?

--------------------
Polaris - owns you.
Undead Theories - double U slash E
Posts: 3323 | Registered: Thursday, April 25 2002 07:00
BANNED
Member # 4
Profile Homepage #63
Raze your house.

--------------------
*
Posts: 6936 | Registered: Tuesday, September 18 2001 07:00
...b10010b...
Member # 869
Profile Homepage #64
Try ammonia.

--------------------
The Empire Always Loses: This Time For Sure!
Posts: 9973 | Registered: Saturday, March 30 2002 08:00
By Committee
Member # 4233
Profile #65
quote:
Originally written by So I Will Eat Fugu:

Try ammonia.
I've always used bleach. What does ammonia accomplish in a chemically-different fashion than bleach? (And yes, I know not to mix them.)
Posts: 2242 | Registered: Saturday, April 10 2004 07:00
...b10010b...
Member # 869
Profile Homepage #66
Ammonia is a base. Bird crap is mostly uric acid, which is an acid. Acid dissolves better in basic solutions.

--------------------
The Empire Always Loses: This Time For Sure!
Posts: 9973 | Registered: Saturday, March 30 2002 08:00
By Committee
Member # 4233
Profile #67
Hey - you learn something new every day!
Posts: 2242 | Registered: Saturday, April 10 2004 07:00
...b10010b...
Member # 869
Profile Homepage #68
Witness the power of science.

Well, unless it doesn't work, in which case chalk it up to experimental error.

--------------------
The Empire Always Loses: This Time For Sure!
Posts: 9973 | Registered: Saturday, March 30 2002 08:00
By Committee
Member # 4233
Profile #69
Ah, but the power of science is nothing without:

the power of boldface

EDIT: To spice up my garden-variety spam, I googled "Richard White," and the first hit was for a musician at this page. A hit for our Richard White doesn't occur until the sixth page, and that hit is for this forum. The search turned up 41,400,000 results. He definitely falls victim to anonymous name syndrome (ANS), with which I can definitely sympathize!

EDIT 2: removed an enormous image.

[ Wednesday, May 18, 2005 11:52: Message edited by: Andrew Miller ]
Posts: 2242 | Registered: Saturday, April 10 2004 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 335
Profile Homepage #70
Combining "Richard White" with "Ocean Bound," "Lost Souls," or "Galactic Core," or "Chromite" in Google turned up nothing more promising. Richard is conspicuously AWOL.

—Alorael, who would be quite willing to grant RW leave if it would prevent further GCs.
Posts: 14579 | Registered: Saturday, December 1 2001 08:00
Warrior
Member # 5091
Profile #71
You don't want to bleach bird crap anyway. It's got some ammonia in it, and chloramine is best kept in your drinking water.

Colors have all sorts of effects. In the gardening world, there's some excitement over studies that show bright red ground cover enhances the growth of tomato plants and their fruit.

A lot of animals considered to be color blind aren't, really; dogs are dichromatic, and cats are somewhat trichromatic.

Cattle, on the other hand, are entirely color-blind.
Posts: 180 | Registered: Friday, October 15 2004 07:00
Master
Member # 1046
Profile Homepage #72
And that's why I suggested a hose and lots of water. Dual supersoakers will also suffice.

EDIT: me no engeerishu

[ Thursday, May 19, 2005 09:30: Message edited by: Wise Man is a ]

--------------------
Polaris - owns you.
Undead Theories - double U slash E
Posts: 3323 | Registered: Thursday, April 25 2002 07:00
By Committee
Member # 4233
Profile #73
Unfortunately, the balcony is attached to the one-bedroom condo I share with my fiancee on the fourth floor of the building - hoses aren't a good option. :(
Posts: 2242 | Registered: Saturday, April 10 2004 07:00
Master
Member # 1046
Profile Homepage #74
Well that limits a lot. If you're not afraid of getting up close and personal to that stuff, you can always scrub it off with one of those steel wool sponges.

EDIT: me no engeerishu again

[ Thursday, May 19, 2005 20:50: Message edited by: Wise Man is a ]

--------------------
Polaris - owns you.
Undead Theories - double U slash E
Posts: 3323 | Registered: Thursday, April 25 2002 07:00

Pages