More classical music and such...

Pages

AuthorTopic: More classical music and such...
Senile Reptile
Member # 547
Profile #0
Alrighty, lots of new people have joined since I last started a classical music topic.

Who's your favorite composer? What's your favorite piece? Do you play an instrument? For how long? Etc, etc.

I'm now listening to Rachmainoff's first piano concerto for the first time, and I'm loving it quite a bit. I think the second one is better, bit this is a marvellous piece nonetheless.

I've been playing piano for twelve years. I'm working on Rachmainoff's Sonata for Cello and Piano in G minor, among other things.

--------------------
Polaris
Posts: 1614 | Registered: Wednesday, January 23 2002 08:00
Agent
Member # 27
Profile #1
I don't know if this is the classic you are thinking of, but I love Classical Guitar. I do not own any Classic Guitar songs, but it's cool to listen to my teacher play them on his guitar. I have been taking guitar lessions for almost six months and am making quite good progress (I know almost all of the major chords (except "A" and the worst of them all "B.")

My favorite Classical performer would probably be Leo Kotkee.

--------------------
"You know a book is good, when it makes you feel like crying or reaching into its fictional realm and strangling one of the characters."
Posts: 1233 | Registered: Wednesday, October 3 2001 07:00
Off With Their Heads
Member # 4045
Profile Homepage #2
I will now name all the classical songs that I know and like:

"Hall of the Mountain King," by Grieg (and most of Peer/Peter Gynt for that matter)
"Fur Elise," by Beethoven
"Symphony no. 5," by Beethoven
"O Fortuna" in particular and the rest of the Carmina Burana (little unclear on the origin of this thing)
"Liebestraum," by Liszt
"Ride of the Valkyries," by Wagner
"Greensleeves," apparently by King Henry VIII

I am something of an uncultured slob when it comes to classical music.

I tried to play the piano for about a month and quit. I played the guitar for a year or two when I was about seven but remember none of it.

I am also rather partial to Michael Kamen because of his work with rock bands.

[ Tuesday, April 13, 2004 17:12: Message edited by: Kelandon ]

--------------------
Kelandon's Pink and Pretty Page!! (The home of BoA's HLPM, newly updated to v1.1!)

Rate my scenarios!
Northern Kingdom 0: Prologue
High Level Party Maker
Posts: 7968 | Registered: Saturday, February 28 2004 08:00
Fire! Fire! Fire! Fire!
Member # 919
Profile #3
*smacks Slith for obvious reasons*

I play piano, drumset, and other percussive instruments (the "other" refering to the drumset, not the piano, so please don't start some kind of string vs percussion argument). Piano for 6 years, percussion for slightly less, drumset... 1/2 or 4 years, depending on whether or not learning the very basic beats at school counts.

My favorite composer... hmm... does Howard Shore count? If not, I'll go with Beethoven. And Tchaikovsky and Copland are definitely up there.

I really don't know what my favorite piece is. It could be something from Lord of the Rings, or the Moonlight Sonata (not just because of that, Motrax), or Copland's... something western, don't remember the name, or Tchaikovsky's Asian steppes thing (again, I don't remember the name), or something I can't think of. I don't usually have favorites of anything, and I don't mean that in an uplifting, we're-all-one-big-loving-family sort of way.

--------------------
And though the musicians would die, the music would live on in the imaginations of all who heard it.
-The Last Pendragon

TEH CONSPIRACY IZ ALL

In case of emergency, break glass.
Posts: 3351 | Registered: Saturday, April 6 2002 08:00
Infiltrator
Member # 3040
Profile #4
I've been playing classical guitar for 2 and a half years. Right now I'm working on Bach's Cello Suite No. 1 in G, transcribed for guitar.

I like Spanish classical music, both for piano and for guitar. My favorite composer is probably Isaac Albeniz, and my favorite piece would be either Cordoba or Asturias, but I really like all of Albeniz's work.

I love Beethoven's Pathetique. I hate the Moonlight Sonata. I hate Fur Elise.

Edit: Oh, and Joaquin Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez is a masterpiece.

[ Tuesday, April 13, 2004 18:55: Message edited by: wz. arsics ]

--------------------
who?
Posts: 508 | Registered: Thursday, May 29 2003 07:00
BANNED
Member # 4
Profile Homepage #5
Beethozart ain't got nothin' on Fagen, Becker et al.

IMAGE(steely00.jpg)

--------------------
Rate My Scenarios!
Streila Spies
Unbalanced Accounts
Inn of Blades
Echoes
Echoes: Assault
Echoes: Black Horse
Echoes: Pawns
Bandits
Echoes: Combat/Skirmish
Two Strands
Bandits II: Ballad of the Red Star
Roses of Reckoning (BoE)
Corporeus
The Claim
Roses of Reckoning (BoA)
Nebulous Times Hence
Posts: 6936 | Registered: Tuesday, September 18 2001 07:00
Lifecrafter
Member # 3310
Profile #6
Instrument: the clarinet. Played it for...six years? Can't remember. Sometimes I also play piano but in a very less-than-professional way ( we have one standing in the living room so I guess it was inevitable that I'd pick up a thing or two). Anyway, piano is good if you wan't to relax.

I can't see how anyone would be interested in what I play at the moment, but since you asked, I think it is a Concerto, by Rimskij-Korsakov.

I don't usually listen to classical music. But if you'd point a gun at my head, I'd say my favourite composers were Puccini, Mozart and Debussy. I like operas, as you might have figured out. Music isn't just music without the words... IMAGE(tongue00.gif)
Posts: 756 | Registered: Monday, August 4 2003 07:00
Senile Reptile
Member # 547
Profile #7
Aside from piano, the cello is my favorite instrument. I also like harp, third, but there isn't very much music for that instrument.

The Moonlight Sonata is indeed way overplayed (yes, I know it too), but half the time I've found people don't even know there's anything past the first movement. It's a beautiful piece if played musically.

I like the third movement of the Tempest (Beethoven's 17th Sonata). I also like his 29th Sonata, and the 27th.

--------------------
Polaris
Posts: 1614 | Registered: Wednesday, January 23 2002 08:00
Shaper
Member # 73
Profile #8
I generally listen to rock and similar genres, but classical is okay too. I know the first movements of Moonlight Sonata and Beethoven's 5th Symphony, but so does just about everyone. When I was in 7th and 8th grade, Ms. Lonergan had a classical music station playing on the radio. It wasn't bad.
I can't play any instruments. I can hold a beat though, so I could probably play drums if I wanted to. I might pick that up, and maybe piano and guitar. But not classical. Rock.

quote:
Originally written by Seaweed:

Music isn't just music without the words...
Yes it is. Music with no words is music. When you add the words, it becomes a song. But I'm guessing you meant "just isn't," not "isn't just."
The Beatles are the best band ever, by the way.

--------------------
My BoE graphics archive is finally getting started! Yay! I hope you like my graphics.My BoE Graphics
An absurdly fun Flash game- Refridgerator Raid!
---------
The Lyceum- A board for BoE. Yes it is. Really. Stop staring at me! Stop it, I say! Oh, sorry...
Posts: 2957 | Registered: Thursday, October 4 2001 07:00
Guardian
Member # 3521
Profile #9
^ You'll get no argument from me...

As my older sister is a fine violinist, and has played for almost fifteen years, I have been exposed to a good deal of Classical music. However, I tend to lack the patience to listen to most forms of Western Classical music, although when I am capable of listening to a piece all the way through, I often do like it to a degree. Aram Khatchaturian's "Saber Dance" is my favorite of the pieces I have managed to really listen to.

In terms of Hindustani (North Indian) Classical music, however, I am certainly a fan, as well as a practitioner, having taken lessons for about six years.

[ Wednesday, April 14, 2004 12:44: Message edited by: Spongiform Stug ]

--------------------
Stughalf

"The death-knell of the republic had rung as soon as the active power became lodged in the hands of those who sought, not to do justice to all citizens, rich and poor alike, but to stand for one special class and for its interests as opposed to the interests of others."- Theodore Roosevelt, 1903.
Posts: 1798 | Registered: Sunday, October 5 2003 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 335
Profile Homepage #10
I'm still a fan of Bach, Telemann, and Vivaldi, but I love far too many composer and pieces to list them all. Handel deserves a nod as well, as do Mozart, Beethoven, and... I'm not going to keep listing.

?Alorael, who is still one of the few, the proud, the recorder players. Don't laugh, please!
Posts: 14579 | Registered: Saturday, December 1 2001 08:00
Shock Trooper
Member # 1506
Profile #11
quote:
Originally written by Spongiform Stug:

In terms of Hindustani (North Indian) Classical music, however, I am certainly a fan, as well as a practitioner, having taken lessons for about six years.
That's fascinating. Forgive me for not knowing the proper names for these things, but do you play the 27-stringed guitar thing or the small drums? Or perhaps you play the instrument that provides the drone?

--------------------
desperance.net -- Come on in, we don't bite. Well, I don't.
Posts: 218 | Registered: Saturday, July 13 2002 07:00
Bob's Big Date
Member # 3151
Profile Homepage #12
quote:
Originally written by Alorael:

I'm still a fan of Bach, Telemann, and Vivaldi, but I love far too many composer and pieces to list them all. Handel deserves a nod as well, as do Mozart, Beethoven, and... I'm not going to keep listing.

?Alorael, who is still one of the few, the proud, the recorder players. Don't laugh, please!

Arrrrrrrgh! Baroque! Hate! Hate!

The only baroque I will stand, being a violist of seven years, is Vivaldi, and even then only occasionally. I greatly prefer the romantics, with Strauss, Wagner, and Beethoven being just a couple of favorites. I can go for a lot of classical, and some modern, but just about no baroque, and pre-baroque is an offense against God.

I tend to loathe people who consider listening to classical music an intellectual activity. Frankly, it's no less so than modern music, which often has a message as well as a sound.

--------------------
AnamaFreak (3:59:56 AM): Shounen-ai to the MAX
Misogynism is the wave of the future,
but it sure pisses the womenfolk off.

Shocking, isn't it?
Posts: 2367 | Registered: Friday, June 27 2003 07:00
Shock Trooper
Member # 2123
Profile #13
I'm glad to see some one else likes Bach. I also enjoy Travosicy and a buch of others that I know I can't even spell. Why do they all have such hard names to spell or even say?

I'll listen to all classical music even when my friends give me griff about it. Right now I'm traped in this thing of taking classical musice and remixing it in to a techno/trance. It's really fun but it losses some of the felling of the original piece.

I play the piano a little on the side and can play a little drums and eletirc and acustic guitar.

My favorite song? I like all. They are all great works of art in my book.

--------------------
With his last breath he took in more power then any Guardian could hold, then with a scream of pain and furry he unleashed it all to form a barrier betwen the Mantia and the Darkness.
Posts: 228 | Registered: Monday, October 21 2002 07:00
Shock Trooper
Member # 3377
Profile #14
I love a great many composers. The ones I lean most towards are the romantics and movie score composers. Sibelius, Dvorak, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Ennio Morricone, Hans Zimmer...

Favourite pieces in no particular order:
-The Firebird Suite, Igor Stravinsky
-Symphonies No 1&2, Sibelius
-Symphonies No 6&9, Dvorak
-The Planets, Holst
-too many soundtracks to list
-and a great deal of others

I've played on and off the flute for fourteen years and the violin for ten, both in an amateurish sort of way. The pieces I'm most familiar with are all orchestral, that being where I get most of my playing done. "Peter and the Wolf", "Der Rosenkavalier", Beethoven, Brahms, etc, etc.

--------------------
From many a wondrous grot and secret cell
Unnumbered and enormous polypi
Winnow with giant fins the slumbering green.
Posts: 356 | Registered: Saturday, August 23 2003 07:00
Guardian
Member # 3521
Profile #15
quote:
Originally written by Hawkgirl:

quote:
Originally written by Spongiform Stug:

In terms of Hindustani (North Indian) Classical music, however, I am certainly a fan, as well as a practitioner, having taken lessons for about six years.
That's fascinating. Forgive me for not knowing the proper names for these things, but do you play the 27-stringed guitar thing or the small drums? Or perhaps you play the instrument that provides the drone?

I sing, and also play the harmonium, a piano-like instrument with a bellows at its rear. One plays the harmonium using only the right hand, as the left hand is used to pump the bellows to generate wind vibration. The sound produced is a rich and full one, not unlike the sound produced by a pipe organ. Although it is impossible to hold notes indefinitely on a piano, one can do so on a harmonium as long as one continues to pump the bellows. Although the harmonium is a stand-alone instrument, it's most often used to accompany oneself while singing. The tanpura (which is the droning string instrument you mentioned) is not used to accompany individual notes, as the harmonium is, but rather to provide a drone in the background. Its four strings are plucked over and over again, setting the rhythm for the singer, and it is always tuned carefully so as to produce a drone that is in perfect tune with the song. I've played the tanpura before to accompany my singing, but it's rather an awkward instrument to play, as one must seat it on his lap, then wrap his arm around it in order to play correctly. I vastly prefer playing the harmonium, although having someone else play tanpura in the background provides a nice atmospheric drone and improves everything.

Complex string instruments such as the sitar, veena, and others require more attention than do the above two mentioned, and are not used as accompanying instruments. I've never learned how to play any of these instruments. In terms of percussion instruments, I've never played the tabla (the small drums you mentioned), or any other instrument of the kind.

--------------------
Stughalf

"The death-knell of the republic had rung as soon as the active power became lodged in the hands of those who sought, not to do justice to all citizens, rich and poor alike, but to stand for one special class and for its interests as opposed to the interests of others."- Theodore Roosevelt, 1903.
Posts: 1798 | Registered: Sunday, October 5 2003 07:00
Babelicious
Member # 3149
Profile Homepage #16
On the "Sea Change" tour, Beck would regularly perform "Nobody's Fault But My Own" solo with a harmonium. The song is usually played with a full accompaniament of European and Indian instruments, but the solo harmonium gives the song a rather spooky and desolate atmosphere.

--------------------
Beatoff Valley: A story told out of order.
Posts: 999 | Registered: Friday, June 27 2003 07:00
Infiltrator
Member # 2104
Profile Homepage #17
I've been playing trumpet for four years, flute for a month, and I play piano on the side. I like Johannes Bach, and I like Pachelbel Canon, Minuet, and Peer Gynt Suite.

--Jonnie Zahndi Zolohahni

EDIT: Spelling Mistakes.

[ Wednesday, April 14, 2004 16:37: Message edited by: Jonnie Zolohahni ]

--------------------
—Jonah Zahndi Zolohahni
Jonnie's Domain.
JDF — Jonnie's Domain Forums.
Posts: 549 | Registered: Thursday, October 17 2002 07:00
Guardian
Member # 3521
Profile #18
quote:
Originally written by Maaya:

On the "Sea Change" tour, Beck would regularly perform "Nobody's Fault But My Own" solo with a harmonium. The song is usually played with a full accompaniament of European and Indian instruments, but the solo harmonium gives the song a rather spooky and desolate atmosphere.
I am certainly a Beck fan, but I've never heard that song before. I'll have to check it out. The harmonium has been used in Western music in the past, as well. One notable example is "The Word," by the Beatles, in which George Martin plays the harmonium for a bit. He wasn't well-practiced in the instrument, and it shows in the recording, but the presence of the harmonium is still a nice touch.

--------------------
Stughalf

"The death-knell of the republic had rung as soon as the active power became lodged in the hands of those who sought, not to do justice to all citizens, rich and poor alike, but to stand for one special class and for its interests as opposed to the interests of others."- Theodore Roosevelt, 1903.
Posts: 1798 | Registered: Sunday, October 5 2003 07:00
BANNED
Member # 4
Profile Homepage #19
Listening to classical music isn't an intellectual exercize.

Trying to figure out Steely Dan is sheer torture if you aren't ready to spend hours on it.

--------------------
Rate My Scenarios!
Streila Spies
Unbalanced Accounts
Inn of Blades
Echoes
Echoes: Assault
Echoes: Black Horse
Echoes: Pawns
Bandits
Echoes: Combat/Skirmish
Two Strands
Bandits II: Ballad of the Red Star
Roses of Reckoning (BoE)
Corporeus
The Claim
Roses of Reckoning (BoA)
Nebulous Times Hence
Posts: 6936 | Registered: Tuesday, September 18 2001 07:00
Agent
Member # 1104
Profile Homepage #20
Instruments - well, I've played the piano for a while then gave up abruptly...something to do with my parents forcing me to have to sit in front of a piano for an hour and play the same song over and over and over and over...you get the picture.

Composers - The three that most stick out in my mind right now are Mozart, Bach, and Beethoven.

--------------------
Chance Forums
Posts: 1307 | Registered: Tuesday, May 7 2002 07:00
Shock Trooper
Member # 1506
Profile #21
quote:
Originally written by Tentacle Monster:

Listening to classical music isn't an intellectual exercize.

Trying to figure out Steely Dan is sheer torture if you aren't ready to spend hours on it.

That depends on whether you're trying to understand it or just listen to it. It's certainly an intellectual exercise for me to discover exactly how a piece of music works, whether it's classical or modern.

--------------------
desperance.net -- Come on in, we don't bite. Well, I don't.
Posts: 218 | Registered: Saturday, July 13 2002 07:00
BANNED
Member # 4
Profile Homepage #22
I'm curious, how creative are classical composers? I won't argue for or against they're being geniuses, that's a futile exercize. What pushes me away from classical music (or at least, one of the things) is that the music is not just influenced but also restrained by the society in which it was made. Deviation would have resulted in open riot, and it did on at least one occasion, IIRC. Modern music is nothing but better for the Postmodern lack of restrictions on what is "good" or "bad", but ancient music never had the opportunity to be as truly creative (and dare I say perverse) with chord progressions as Steely Dan.

Perhaps Beethoven would have been a beebop-rocker like Fagen. Perhaps not.

PS- Romanticism sucks.

--------------------
Rate My Scenarios!
Streila Spies
Unbalanced Accounts
Inn of Blades
Echoes
Echoes: Assault
Echoes: Black Horse
Echoes: Pawns
Bandits
Echoes: Combat/Skirmish
Two Strands
Bandits II: Ballad of the Red Star
Roses of Reckoning (BoE)
Corporeus
The Claim
Roses of Reckoning (BoA)
Nebulous Times Hence
Posts: 6936 | Registered: Tuesday, September 18 2001 07:00
...b10010b...
Member # 869
Profile Homepage #23
Surely the ability to cause riots can only serve to make art more interesting?

That's the problem with art, really -- it only works the first time.

--------------------
I believe there are 15 747 724 136 275 002 577 105 653 961 181 555 468 044 717 914 527 116 709 366 231 425 076 185 631 031 296 protons in the universe, and the same number of electrons. -- Sir Arthur Eddington
Posts: 9973 | Registered: Saturday, March 30 2002 08:00
Shock Trooper
Member # 455
Profile #24
Alec, do you ever listen to the baroque violinist Rachel Podger? Her performances -- esp. unaccompanied Bach and Telemann -- got me liking what never did much for me before, but I'm a strategically-shaved chimp on these subjects.

Speaking of which, TM, though your virtues are many and estimable, you have the musical sense of a divorced 55-year-old school psychologist whom no amount of baldness will make abandon his pony tail. Why not dabble in the early works of Genesis while you're at it? Or Magma?

--------------------
Winter comes: game over -- he's in the driveway removing snow with a flame-thrower.
Posts: 265 | Registered: Saturday, December 29 2001 08:00

Pages