Mac OS X

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AuthorTopic: Mac OS X
Master
Member # 5977
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I don't want to start a Mac vs PC war, but I have to ask this. Is it worthwhile, you who are working with it, its you who I'm asking, to switch from my old Imac G3, to a new Mac mini with Mac OS 10.4? I', now using Mac OS 9.2.2, and its faster then my mothers Emac. What's your opinion?

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"remember, children, that chickens are your friends. you must only eat them when you've the appropriate oven and gardening supplies."- As said by Benjamin van Soldt himself.

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Olga's fortune teller kiosk has been temporarily closed down, but you can contact the prophet with a PM - Was signed by the prophet of the almighty chicken gods, gods of everything that is a chicken.
Posts: 3029 | Registered: Saturday, June 18 2005 07:00
? Man, ? Amazing
Member # 5755
Profile #1
Figure out what you want to do with a computer,
Ask yourself if your current computer can do it.

If No, do some research on cnet or other review sites.

If Yes, disconnect from the internet immediately.

*this message sponsored by the salmon gods*
Posts: 4114 | Registered: Monday, April 25 2005 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 335
Profile Homepage #2
If all the software you use is OS 9 native, and you don't really want any newer software, it's fine to stick with OS 9. I did for years. If you want to keep up with the ever-changing world of things that blink and beep on your computer, you'll have to switch to OS X eventually.

If your iMac has a good enough processor, you could even install OS X on it, although probably not the newest version. Then again, slow processors get frustrating after a while. It all really depends on how happy you are right now and how much you want or need to make the great leap forward.

—Alorael, who would suggest waiting a year or two if you can stand it. The switch to Intel processors is a big change, and if you can hold off on buying a new computer until you can get an Intel, you can avoid the worst of immediate obsolescence.
Posts: 14579 | Registered: Saturday, December 1 2001 08:00
By Committee
Member # 4233
Profile #3
My G3 iBook runs 10.3.9 fine. I haven't come up with a reason to justify switching to 10.4 yet, and hopefully won't - $100 is a pretty steep price for just a few extra bells and whistles.

[ Wednesday, November 02, 2005 09:15: Message edited by: Drew ]
Posts: 2242 | Registered: Saturday, April 10 2004 07:00
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Actually, the newer the version, the faster it'll run.

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Posts: 1798 | Registered: Thursday, October 4 2001 07:00
Master
Member # 5977
Profile Homepage #5
My Imac can do almost everything I want it to do. Its five years old and has some problems (like instant freeze after doing quit by shortcut), but I've never been more proud of a computer or any other apparatus. The only problem is that newer software is made for Mac OS X. The BoA 3D editor I now use on my PC. internet I mainly do on my PC. playing games I mainly do on my PC. Itunes is now only for Mac OS X, although I still have Itunes 2 on my Imac. All this because I'm afraid my Imac would get a hartattack. If I would put Mac OS X on my Imac, I'm afraid my Imac wouldn't take it. This mainly because I only have 2 giga's left on my harddisk. In any case I still would have to wait till july next year before the money will come avaiable. The computer I'm aiming for is a mac mini with Mac OS 10.4. When I got it, my PC will become almost redundant, something I would like to see happening, because with every minute that it gets slower, my frustration is doubled.

So in summary:

Can my current Imac do everything I want? No
Can a mac mini do everything I want? probably (although certain things I'll ALWAYS do on my Imac. I've never felt such nostalgia with a computer. Only the thought of bringing my dear Imac, wrapped in paper, to the big blackness called "the attic," makes me cry, and I'm serious)
Am I fed up with the PC? YES
Do I like Mac OS X at all? Don't know really. At the moment not really.
Do I see a reason to change? software

What I mainly ask is what your general opinions of Mac OS X are. What do you guys make of it?

(And then one last thing: Of all systems, I find Mac OS 9.2.2 the nicest most stablest system of all)

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"remember, children, that chickens are your friends. you must only eat them when you've the appropriate oven and gardening supplies."- As said by Benjamin van Soldt himself.

Click here for more information on Olga's fortune teller kiosk

Olga's fortune teller kiosk has been temporarily closed down, but you can contact the prophet with a PM - Was signed by the prophet of the almighty chicken gods, gods of everything that is a chicken.
Posts: 3029 | Registered: Saturday, June 18 2005 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 4153
Profile Homepage #6
My iBook has never had a serious problem, and it's been running OS X for over a year and a half. Most of the problems that have occurred had to do with Classic applications, actually...

I'm perfectly happy with OS X. Though I do miss the happy mac icon.

Really, it's just a matter of what you're happy with. If you prefer an older mac and can work with it, then stick with it.

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Posts: 4130 | Registered: Friday, March 26 2004 08:00
Infiltrator
Member # 5991
Profile Homepage #7
i have 2 probs with mac the fact they have hardly any hardrive space and pitiful amount of memory ,,at least the macs at my school do

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Posts: 462 | Registered: Tuesday, June 21 2005 07:00
...b10010b...
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Profile Homepage #8
That is probably because they are old. :P

40-80 GB hard drives and 256 MB of RAM is standard for both Macs and Winboxes these days.

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Posts: 9973 | Registered: Saturday, March 30 2002 08:00
Law Bringer
Member # 335
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I'm also convinced that memory and disk space aren't measured in the same units on Macs and PCs. It's not as bad as processors, which really don't compare at all, but a file that is one size on a PC often seems significantly different in size when transferred to a Mac.

OS 9.2.2 and OS X compare in stability like a top and the table it's spinning on. I like OS 9 and miss it sometimes, but OS X is much less prone to problems.

—Alorael, who would like to point out that any school computer, like any collectively used item, is likely to be abused, nonsensically maintained, and elderly. Computers have the additional problem of (generally) only moderately competent IT support.
Posts: 14579 | Registered: Saturday, December 1 2001 08:00
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oh lol my comp has 100gb hard drive ,384 mb ram .....but still you open 1 program on mac open another and it tells you not enough memory to draw correctly or something like that

but my question is do macs have a long life span?they always seem to be very hot where the vent is like hot enough to damage components and are they servicable?

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Posts: 462 | Registered: Tuesday, June 21 2005 07:00
Infiltrator
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A reasonably well treated mac will last for a long time, though so will a similarly treated pc. My family has a number of Mac LC II's and 386 and 486 pcs which all still work fine.

A large amount of heat coming from the vent isn't necessarily a bad thing, that's heat that isn't remaining in your processor and other important components. I find it unlikely that it is hot enough to do actual damage. In addition, I know several people with pcs that actually overheat and cease working, while I have never seen a mac do such a thing.

What exactly do you mean by serviceable? Macs can be repaired like any other computer, though you may have to take them to a specialist if you care about your warranty. On the other hand, many models of macs are not very upgradable, and the mac mini, which Thralni was considering, is one of those because the thing literally has pretty much no more space to put anything into.

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Posts: 627 | Registered: Monday, March 7 2005 08:00
Master
Member # 5977
Profile Homepage #12
My Imac can get very hot sometimes. Then it cools down and nothing happened, so no. I don't think the heat is a problem. What I find strange (and an enormous plus) about my Imac, is that you don't hear the vent. It always silent as the grave. Can anybody explain me this?

Then another thing: I have 2gb free on my harddisk. I could buy an external harddisk of 40gb and connect it to my Imac. Its processor is a G3 of 350mHz. Will it take Mac OS X or suffer from a hartattack the minute I install it on the computer, because it definetely could run Mac OS X.

EDIT: The reason I was thinking of a mac mini, is that its cheap. mouse and keyboard I already have. I'll buy a cheap flatscreen with it, and then I'll have the screen for my PC and my Mac. But its mainly to save money and get a very small space saving computer.

[ Thursday, November 03, 2005 04:06: Message edited by: Thralni, emperor of Riverrod ]

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"remember, children, that chickens are your friends. you must only eat them when you've the appropriate oven and gardening supplies."- As said by Benjamin van Soldt himself.

Click here for more information on Olga's fortune teller kiosk

Olga's fortune teller kiosk has been temporarily closed down, but you can contact the prophet with a PM - Was signed by the prophet of the almighty chicken gods, gods of everything that is a chicken.
Posts: 3029 | Registered: Saturday, June 18 2005 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 335
Profile Homepage #13
I've never had an Apple die on me. I first had a second-hand LC II that was just too old and clunky, and I replaced it with one of the later Performas. It was always a little bit iffy, sometimes requiring manual hard drive nudging to work, and it once cannibalized a hard drive, but it survived. I eventually gave it to someone in need of a computer and replaced it with a G4 Cube. It was a combination of never really loving that Performa, needing a processor upgrade, and thinking that as long as I had to replace a monitor (it apparently underwent a blue-shift), I might as well go for a new computer too. The Cube is still just fine, although for the past four months I've been on a PowerBook. So no, I've never had a Mac die on me. The Performa suffered progressive decay from day one, but it always worked. The rest have been immortal, as far as I know.

My understanding is that some versions of OS X will work fine and some require newer processors. That's something worth looking up or emailing Apple's tech support about.

—Alorael, who has also noticed that iMacs are upgradable. It's probably not easy enough for you to want to do it yourself unless you're very confident, but the prices are fairly low and it's worth looking into as an alternative if you can't get OS X to work as is. All this reminds him that he wants to upgrade his Cube, too.
Posts: 14579 | Registered: Saturday, December 1 2001 08:00
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quote:
A reasonably well treated mac will last for a long time, though so will a similarly treated pc. My family has a number of Mac LC II's and 386 and 486 pcs which all still work fine.

A large amount of heat coming from the vent isn't necessarily a bad thing, that's heat that isn't remaining in your processor and other important components. I find it unlikely that it is hot enough to do actual damage. In addition, I know several people with pcs that actually overheat and cease working, while I have never seen a mac do such a thing.

What exactly do you mean by serviceable? Macs can be repaired like any other computer, though you may have to take them to a specialist if you care about your warranty. On the other hand, many models of macs are not very upgradable, and the mac mini, which Thralni was considering, is one of those because the thing literally has pretty much no more space to put anything into.

my 5 year old hewlett packards power supply has started over heating do to im on my comp so much
But the good news is for one it has a fail safe built in to shut down the computer before it can hurt anything and until i can buy a new power supply i am running it without the cover and an external fan running to cool the power supply ...since i put the fan it hasnt over heated once

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Posts: 462 | Registered: Tuesday, June 21 2005 07:00
Warrior
Member # 4710
Profile #15
Just one thing to mention, generally, most people upgrade either their RAM or harddrive to larger values. I for instance, have a 250GB harddrive and 1.5GB of memory on both of my computers.

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Posts: 85 | Registered: Wednesday, July 14 2004 07:00
Lifecrafter
Member # 34
Profile Homepage #16
If your iMac's doing peachily, there's not really much point in switching. There are benefits from having OS X, such as greater software avaliability and the nice feeling of being more on the forefront of technology. But regardless, if you're going to upgrade, DON'T GET A MAC MINI. What Apple did when they made them was take regular old laptop hard drives (which process pretty slowly), put them in a small case, and toss in a few extra MB of ram. It makes much more sense to actually buy an actual laptop (like an iBook or a Powerbook) and buy and install some extra ram yourself. All in all, the cost of buying a Mini and a monitor to go with it is probably much less cost-effective than souping up a laptop. I'd highly recommend a Powerbook or one of the new iMacs (desktop computers have much higher hard drive processing speeds than laptops and Minis both).

And just for the record, Panther (OS 10.3) is really just as good as, if not better than (it's significantly faster than) Tiger (OS 10.4).

Right now I'm using a 2003 iBook, upgraded with Panther and an extra 512 MB of ram. And it runs great!

So to sum, buy an OS X-capable laptop, add in some extra RAM, and find someone with a Panther installation disc. It's a much better deal than a Mini.

[ Thursday, November 03, 2005 18:26: Message edited by: An error of type -13 occured ]

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Posts: 702 | Registered: Wednesday, October 3 2001 07:00
Master
Member # 5977
Profile Homepage #17
I didn't know all that about the mac mini... But you see, its the cheapest mac around. I can only spend 900 euros on a new computer. Is it possible to change processors of a computer? I suppose not. And even if it could be done, it would prbably cost tons of money that I don't have. With that comes a 100 euro for Mac OS X and costs for a bigger harddrive. My wallet wouldn't survive that I think. Still, people, I'm getting quite interested. Do you guys have more tips that I wouldn't hear from Apple?

EDIT: Why is the mac mini actually so slow?

[ Friday, November 04, 2005 05:22: Message edited by: Thralni, emperor of Riverrod ]

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"remember, children, that chickens are your friends. you must only eat them when you've the appropriate oven and gardening supplies."- As said by Benjamin van Soldt himself.

Click here for more information on Olga's fortune teller kiosk

Olga's fortune teller kiosk has been temporarily closed down, but you can contact the prophet with a PM - Was signed by the prophet of the almighty chicken gods, gods of everything that is a chicken.
Posts: 3029 | Registered: Saturday, June 18 2005 07:00
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Replacing the processor of a computer is not really a practical idea. It is possible to overclock most processors, but its still not a recommended thing to do. Besides which, overclocking a 350 MHz G3 wouldn't get you very far compared to what new computers have. With that budget the mac mini does look like about the best fit for you, particularly since you already have the peripherals, though you could afford a low end iBook if you really wanted, I think.
The mac mini actually isn't that slow, the lower end model is almost as fast and the two higher end models are faster than my one year old powerbook. Just looking at the processor numbers gives only a rough estimate of the speed, benchtesting is the best way to determine the relative performance of two computers. Of course, the mac mini isn't really intended to be fast, it's made to be cheap, so you have to expect that it won't be the fastest out there.

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Posts: 627 | Registered: Monday, March 7 2005 08:00
Warrior
Member # 5268
Profile #19
I just noticed this topic so would add my own experience which seems directly relevant.

I was running a 400MHz iMac on OS 9 for a long time. I upgraded it to OS X 10.3 about a year ago (that was actually necessary for me to get broadband working through my ISP - no Apple support but OS X was able to work regardless, OS 9 just didn't). It was perfectly useable in OS X through to about 10.3.7. OS X 10.3.9 is a bit slow on it though. I couldn't really run iMovie on it. I had to use the OS 9 version of iMovie 2 in OS 9 if I wanted to edit movies. It has one advantage over my newest computer (a Powerbook) in that it can boot into OS 9 which is locked out on the Powerbook. Things like Escape Velocity just don't work in Classic.

I don't know what the OS 9 boot situation is on the Mac Mini, but you should check it out. The Mini is slow because it is essentially a laptop in a small desktop formfactor. That is, it runs a 4200RPM (or is it 5400RPM) hard drive which makes a lot of things feel really slow. That said, I'm really happy with my upgrade to the Powerbook (still running 10.3.9) and my iMac sits at the bottom of a closet.
Posts: 148 | Registered: Tuesday, December 7 2004 08:00
Master
Member # 5977
Profile Homepage #20
Well, thanks. your reply has really been appreciated. I think the best thing for me to do, is simply to go to the store and look at the mac mini. Feel how its like, see it working, and then I'll decide. My Imac will never be put in the attic, not will it ever leave my room. Ir will stay in my room, and when I need OS 9, my Imac will always be there.

God. My nostalgia is growing freeky. I should stop it, but I can't seem to stop loving the computer that had served me without any problems for the last five years. Sorry, about six.

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"remember, children, that chickens are your friends. you must only eat them when you've the appropriate oven and gardening supplies."- As said by Benjamin van Soldt himself.

Click here for more information on Olga's fortune teller kiosk

Olga's fortune teller kiosk has been temporarily closed down, but you can contact the prophet with a PM - Was signed by the prophet of the almighty chicken gods, gods of everything that is a chicken.
Posts: 3029 | Registered: Saturday, June 18 2005 07:00
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Profile Homepage #21
dont bother with a new comp my 5 year old hp still dusts my friends new dell

besides new computers are made to expire quickly so you have to buy again in like 2 years maybe less

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Posts: 462 | Registered: Tuesday, June 21 2005 07:00
Master
Member # 1046
Profile Homepage #22
I buy my own parts from my brother's friend's shop, and build it myself. If I feel lazy, I just pick my parts from the shop and tell the guy to build my comp with those. It's cheaper that way, AND it lasts longer than that HP/Compaq/Dell crap that the sheeple buy.

I mean, I bought my old computer back in 1999 and it's still only just below average. A Dell for the same price would be junk by now.

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Posts: 3323 | Registered: Thursday, April 25 2002 07:00
Too Sexy for my Title
Member # 5654
Profile #23
Seriously, what's the deal with Dell?
Everywhere I go everyone has one. However, I keep getting mix reviews. Some say is one of the best computer branches out there, and others say is all publicity. What's the truth?
Posts: 1035 | Registered: Friday, April 1 2005 08:00
Mongolian Barbeque
Member # 1528
Profile #24
I have a Compaq Pressario from the early '90s that's still working amazingly well all things considered. It's easily the most stable computer I've ever had, and has the best word-processing program on it that I've ever used.

Dells are bad, based on things I've heard from reliable sources. I read a report of a Dell laptop suddenly catching on fire becuase its lithium battery was so badly made. There were some very scary photos attached.

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