Favorite Redwall Book

Pages

AuthorTopic: Favorite Redwall Book
Infiltrator
Member # 5566
Profile #25
quote:
Originally written by Stugri-La:

quote:
Originally written by Jewels of the Forest:

Based soley on event, the revelation of the Badger Lord treasure was my favorite so far. I think that was in Salamandastron but I can't be sure.
It was. Quite an exciting moment, for sure.

quote:
Originally written by Ghaldrings_doom:
What's his name with the scar across his face is also a great warrior.
Are you thinking of the sea otter Finbarr Galedeep from The Bellmaker? He was covered with scars, and certainly a great warrior.

Or posibly Taggerung or watever with the mark from the book named Taggerung I think his name was Taggerung but I am not sure
Posts: 507 | Registered: Tuesday, March 1 2005 08:00
Agent
Member # 3364
Profile Homepage #26
quote:
Originally written by Ghaldrings_doom:

What's his name with the scar across his face is also a great warrior.
Funny... Cluny was the first to come to my mind. He was a great warrior. At least a great, cowardly, evil warrior.

Edit: Then there's also the villan who wears a mask and comes to Redwall as a carnival ringmaster. I believe the whole half of his face was scarred.

[ Monday, July 11, 2005 19:32: Message edited by: Jewels of the Forest ]

--------------------
"Even the worst Terror from Hell can be transformed to a testimony from Heaven!" - Rev. David Wood 6\23\05

"Do all the good you can, by all the means you can, in all the ways you can, in all the places you can, at all the times you can, to all the people you can, as long as you ever can." - John Wesley
Posts: 1001 | Registered: Tuesday, August 19 2003 07:00
Guardian
Member # 3521
Profile #27
That'd be Slagar The Cruel, the fox villain from Mattimeo. Good with a bolas, but rather cowardly as well. That's somewhat of a failing in Jacques' books- every villain always seems to be quite cunning and resourceful until he comes face to face with the hero, at which point he inexplicably turns into a cringing ninny.

[ Tuesday, July 12, 2005 12:24: Message edited by: Stugri-La ]

--------------------
Stughalf

"Delusion arises from anger. The mind is bewildered by delusion. Reasoning is destroyed when the mind is bewildered. One falls down when reasoning is destroyed."- The Bhagavad Gita.
Posts: 1798 | Registered: Sunday, October 5 2003 07:00
Master
Member # 4614
Profile Homepage #28
Well, while they do have their plans, many leaders are nearly overtaken by their own creatures. Most of them sure don't have it easy, especially when oppressing their horderats or whatever.

I like the molespeech, though.

Hurr, io coint hoardly stand the smell o' woild garlick, but io dearly loik the taste. :)

It's a lot better in the books.

--------------------
-ben4808
Posts: 3360 | Registered: Friday, June 25 2004 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 6489
Profile Homepage #29
The first Redwall book I ever read was Mossflower. After that, I read Redwall, then Mattimeo. After that, I read each new one as it came out, from Mariel through Rackety Tam. I would have to say that Mossflower is my favorite. However, I loved all of them, with the exception of Outcast, that book was pretty bad.

[ Monday, November 21, 2005 04:14: Message edited by: Tyranicus ]

--------------------
"You're drinking liquor because you're thirsty? How nasty is your freaking water?" —Lazarus
Spiderweb Chat Room
Avernum RPSummariesOoCRoster
Shadow Vale - My site, home of the Spiderweb Chat Database, BoA Scenario Database, & the A1 Quest List, among other things.
Posts: 1556 | Registered: Sunday, November 20 2005 08:00
Lifecrafter
Member # 34
Profile Homepage #30
It's been a few years, but I definitely liked 'Pearls of Lutra'. And the bleepity bleeping descriptions of food in those books made me drool.

--------------------
Frisbeetarianism is the belief that when you die, your soul goes up on the roof and gets stuck.

'Spiderweb Software' anagrammmed: 'Word-bereft A**wipe'
Posts: 702 | Registered: Wednesday, October 3 2001 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 335
Profile Homepage #31
It's been a long time since I read a Redwall book, but I think I remember liking Salamandastron and Mossflower.

—Alorael, who definitely remembers thinking that it might be best to read the books in reverse chronological order. That way you never run into the creation of a secret before its revelation. Reading in publishing order probably works as well if not better, though.
Posts: 14579 | Registered: Saturday, December 1 2001 08:00
Master
Member # 4614
Profile Homepage #32
And skipping randomly around can be better yet.

Heh, I remember this topic. :P

--------------------
-ben4808
Posts: 3360 | Registered: Friday, June 25 2004 07:00
Infiltrator
Member # 2245
Profile Homepage #33
quote:

Favorite Redwall Book

I used to be a fan of Brian Jacques until I realized that he just writes the same old trash time and time again. I also discovered far better books which weren't so cliched.

I think he just runs to his word processor, loads one of his previous books, changes the names of the characters, and then invents a stupid song about food for the idiot Redwallers to sing. Then he invents a new, clever title, and announces that he's just finished another book.

Before I'm accused of not knowing anything about the series, I have read the following...

Martin the Warrior, Mossflower, Outcast of Redwall, Mariel of Redwall, Salamandastron, Lord Brocktree, The Taggerung, The Long Patrol, Redwall, the Pearls of Lutra, the Bellmaker, Mattimeo, Marlfox, and the Legend of Luke.

You might ask why I've read so many if I now hate the series. Let's just say that I enjoyed the first books because they were something different. I then became more and more disappointed, buying and borrowing Brian's newer books because I thought to myself "He's bound to break the mould sooner or later!".

Much to my disappointment, that never happened. This snowballed into me realizing that his style of writing is BS. To be honest, J.K Rowling's writing is BS, but she diverts our attention away from quite a bit of her cliche with plot twists and imaginative material (well, in Books 1, 2 and 3, anyway. I'm not going into that!)

Rest assured, I'm never going to borrow or buy another books, because I already know the plot.

1. Evil vermin are threatening either Redwall, Salamandastron, or some poor innocent mice. Typically, these 'evil' vermin are stoats, weasels, rats, foxes, crows, magpies and wildcats. Jeesh, looks like Brian was a fan of 'Wind in the Willows'!

2. These evil vermin are evil because they are imperialistic. But just in case the audience sympathizes with them, we'll make sure that they carry out continuous acts of unjustified cruelty. Because after all, the vermin are unjustified for feeling rather angry at the Redwallers and Badger Lords, who create communes which 'exclude' vermin. Can't have a peaceful Redwall abbey with all those vermin living inside. Because all vermin are bad. Because Brian makes them so. No reason is given, they just are, dammit!

3. These evil vermin are also damn stupid, and we can rest assured that if an attack on Redwall or Salamandastron is imminent, we can rest assured that it will collapse like Brian's dignity. It's not surprising, since the vermin don't even know how to defend a well barricaded mountain against a far smaller force. Hares are attacking? Cover up the window slits so that we can't fire arrows at our attackers! Don't pour boiling oil on them! Don't throw stones (which are abundant in mountains) onto the heads of yur attackers! Don't post a heavy outpost of troops in the passage which leads into the very heart of your damn fortress! Eat your heart out Ungatt Trunn!

The day Brian writes a Redwall book with a semi-intelligent vermin leader, with officers who can speak proper English, is the day I take back all the mean things I've said about him.

4. The vermin are also almost universally cowards. "Oh noes, a few old rabbits are attacking, let's beg for mercy instead of kicking some tail!"

5. The good guys are peace loving mice, shrews, otters, and hares. They are pacifists, which is why they are constantly killing and maiming numerous bands of vermin (who are often warring amongst each other) so efficiently.

6. 99% of the time, the good guys are 'outnumbered', and then someone comes to the rescue (the Long Patrol, the Skipper and his Otters, Brocktree and his gang).

7. None of the heroes 'die', unless they are old, or haven't had their personality developed (given Brian's one dimensional writing, it's a wonder that any of his characters survive the novel!)

8. The novel ends with the heroes all smiling and high-fiving, squeaking "We sure showed those vermin! I just don't understand why they keep attacking us, given that we've killed and maimed quite a few of them, and forced them back into their hovels, which are located on the most barren land available. Gee, I wonder why they have to raid and plunder for their food?"

Brian also has a habit of killing off characters which were even half decent. The cool Marlfoxes who could turn invisible? Gone... killed by some dopey squirrel and a bunch of kids.

Verdauga? He had a lot of potential as a wise, iron fisted tyrant with a sense of honour. In otherwords, someone who wasn't cliche. That was too much for Brian, so he had to kill him off, before the audience realized that Brian was inept at developing a character who wasn't one-dimensional.

The Monitors from the Pearls of Lutra? We're never told exactly what happened to the remaining Monitors after Mad-Eyes died, they just 'disappear', like Brian's dignity did after he wrote 'Lord Brocktree'.

The Crow General from 'The Bellmaker'? Brian started off with a wise, fair general. When he realized that he might confuse his audience into thinking that perhaps the vermin weren't all that bad, he turned the general into a crackpot. Once again, a lot of lost potential.

Quite simply, ditch this BS. If you want to read a good fable regarding talking animals, try 'Wind in the Willows', or 'House of the Tribes' (forgotten the authors, but you can google on the net).

[ Monday, November 21, 2005 00:47: Message edited by: Waylander ]

--------------------
VIVE LA TAKERS!
VIVE LA REBELLION!
VIVE LA GHALDRING!
Posts: 522 | Registered: Friday, November 15 2002 08:00
Cartographer
Member # 1851
Profile Homepage #34
You forgot that one rat who turned good. I've no idea in what book it was, but basically he and his captain were in the abbey, and they more or less accidentally killed the badger and ran away, except this rat then killed th captain, because killing the badger was a bad thing, and then the good guys forgave him because he was okay for a rat.

Of course, he was basically mentally retarded.

[ Tuesday, November 22, 2005 00:51: Message edited by: OMGwtfshediedkthnxbai ]

--------------------
"I'm not crazy!"
"Well, whatever. Maybe you just ate something really questionable, or perhaps someone hit you on the head with something large, blunt and heavy just now. By the way..." Gil nudged Grul pointedly.

Ooh! Homepage - Blog - Geneforge, +2, +3 - My Elfwood Gallery and DevArt page
So many strange ones around. Don't you think?
Posts: 1308 | Registered: Sunday, September 8 2002 07:00
Master
Member # 4614
Profile Homepage #35
Captain Slipp and Blaggut, IIRC.

Waylander, I certainly agree on some points. However, I really doubt many of these books are directed at the common reader, but rather young teenagers. Some people enjoy all the recursion of endings and the semi-recursion of event timelines (take Hardy Boys), and people will also gradually move on to something else, maybe coming back when BJ books are once again "new".

[ Monday, November 21, 2005 18:33: Message edited by: ben ben ]

--------------------
-ben4808
Posts: 3360 | Registered: Friday, June 25 2004 07:00
Infiltrator
Member # 2245
Profile Homepage #36
quote:

You forgot that one rat who turned good.

Whoop de doo. I can count on one hand the number of vermin who were 'redeemed', or were 'good' in the first place.

1. Gingivere from Mossflower.

2. That sea captain from Pearls of Lutra, who was sort of decent in the end.

3. Blaggut.

Wow, in a series of 10 plus books, Brian has sure done a wonderful job at breaking his stereotype of the 'evil, cruel vermin'.

--------------------
VIVE LA TAKERS!
VIVE LA REBELLION!
VIVE LA GHALDRING!
Posts: 522 | Registered: Friday, November 15 2002 08:00
Warrior
Member # 6268
Profile #37
Bah redwall was cool, but then Jacques wrote 10000000 books exactly like it. (Note: Exageration).
It gets kind of old, but for the answer: Redwall.

--------------------
Un ronron ronchonne, un ronfleur ronfle.
Un rongeur ronge, un roi règne, une orange roule.
Ça c'est la réalité.
Mais si le ronchon ronge, le ronfleur ronchonne,
Le roi roule, le rongeur règne
Et l'orange ronfle,
Ça c'est une autre histoire.
Posts: 66 | Registered: Saturday, September 3 2005 07:00

Pages