Simulated Reality

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AuthorTopic: Simulated Reality
Agent
Member # 2759
Profile Homepage #25
quote:
Originally written by Student of Trinity:

There are so many gruesome murder mystery series out now, that today it occurred to me that someone should write a mystery in which some kind of maniac is killing off all the mystery writers. He takes out author after author, in hideous ways inspired by their own books.
Did you ever see the film Theatre of Blood. It's not exactly what you describe, but similar sentiment...

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Geneforge 4 stuff. Also, everything I know about Avernum | Avernum 2 | Avernum 3 | Avernum 4
Posts: 1104 | Registered: Monday, March 10 2003 08:00
Infiltrator
Member # 4248
Profile #26
quote:
Originally written by Nemesis.:

Regarding the original discussion… can you imagine the shock if you found out that you were just a component of someone's computer game? That'd be like coming to the realization that you're actually just a figment of someone's imagination, in their dream. Then as soon as they wake up, you're just gone.

Do you feel insignificant yet? :P

Nope. In the case I originated in someones imagination, I'm a part of that entity's personality and world-view. The fact that it bothered to make a simulation of me proves I'm of some significance to it. Plus, I won't really be gone even after the dream ends, just like a "real" person doesn't just cease to exist at the point of death; what I was, was perceived to be, and are remembered to have been still affects the entity that created me.

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Life is a neverending carneval where everyone has multiple costumes. I just hope mine are pleasing to the eye.
Posts: 617 | Registered: Tuesday, April 13 2004 07:00
Infiltrator
Member # 7488
Profile #27
quote:
Originally written by Diprosopus:

Dear Misters Mystic and Xel'Raga: Until you are familiar with the issues, for which Nick Ranger generously provides us background information, then do not burden us with your juvenile, verbal diarrhea. Many thanks. :)
I resent that. :mad:

My only post in this thread (other than this one, obviously) was just a silly comment, nothing more. What did I ever do to you? :confused:
quote:
Originally written by Micawber:

Did you ever see the film Theatre of Blood.
I did. Good flick.

[ Saturday, March 01, 2008 09:17: Message edited by: The Mystic ]

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Either I'm crazy, or everybody else is nuts. And I know I'm not crazy because the little man who lives on my shoulder told me so.
If people don't think there's something wrong with you, there's something wrong with you.
Oh well. Another day, another dementia.
Posts: 558 | Registered: Friday, September 15 2006 07:00
Councilor
Member # 6600
Profile Homepage #28
Originally by the Mystic:

quote:
What did I ever do to you?
Diprosopus = troll

That should help clear things up, I think.

Originally by Student of Trinity:

quote:
There are so many gruesome murder mystery series out now, that today it occurred to me that someone should write a mystery in which some kind of maniac is killing off all the mystery writers. He takes out author after author, in hideous ways inspired by their own books. But the police finally begin to track him down, and it all builds up towards a climactic capture scene at the Library of Congress. Then you turn over the last page, and it just says, 'Ha! Got another one!'
Heh.

Another possibility, given that mystery novels tend to become series--which makes sense for detectives but not so much for the regular people who just happen to stumble on murders everywhere they go--we could have a series about a person who recognizes this trend and tries to get away from people, only to have the bodies appear in increasingly outrageous ways. It'll start with a drive-by in a big city, soon come to a body falling out of the sky on a deserted island, and before you know it the protagonist will be coerced into helping solve the murder of an Inthiliiv couple on Europa.

Dikiyoba.

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Episode 4: Spiderweb Reloaded
Posts: 4346 | Registered: Friday, December 23 2005 08:00
Electric Sheep One
Member # 3431
Profile #29
It makes you wonder whether guys like Peter Wimsey were at all safe to know. Maybe these amateur detectives are somehow behind it all, perhaps unconsciously. Descendants of some Zeus-like tryst by Death.

This reminds me for some reason of Fritz Leiber's Death, who in the world of Nehwon is responsible (to the otherwise unmentioned 'Lords of Necessity') for ensuring each hour's quota of expirations. Deaths are assigned by profession: so many farmers, so many heroes, so many kings are slated to off-shuffle in each batch. Death has to decide exactly who in each class gets the ick on each occasion, and exactly how. With heroes, in particular, he tries to be artistic. He permits himself any amount of weirdness, but only goes personally ex machina as a last resort. It is casually mentioned that Death himself is mortal.

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Listen carefully because some of your options may have changed.
Posts: 3335 | Registered: Thursday, September 4 2003 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 2984
Profile Homepage #30
More to the point, I sense that Diprosopus detests silliness, especially that which he considers immature or shallow. He came to this thread intending to deal in philosophy, not jokes, so I can see how he'd be a bit irritable. At least he's not straying into the higher-numbered game forums where he might go postal.

--

quote:
Death himself is mortal.
With strange aeons...

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Also, I am an illusion of the collective imagination of the people I communicate with. An Aran-rep, to paraphrase Stephenson. The mindset is kind of soothing and grants some protection against hubris.
Posts: 8752 | Registered: Wednesday, May 14 2003 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 2984
Profile Homepage #31
quote:
Originally written by Student of Trinity:

Kinsey could get into Unix and solve some cybercrimes: .is_for_hidden, ?is_for_wild, *is_for_completion, that sort of thing.
~is_for_home.

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The Noble and Ancient Order of Polaris - We're Not Yet Dead.
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Did-chat thentagoespyet jumund fori is jus, hat onlime gly nertan ne gethen Firyoubbit 'obio.'
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Posts: 8752 | Registered: Wednesday, May 14 2003 07:00
Shock Trooper
Member # 6754
Profile #32
quote:
Originally written by Student of Trinity:

... someone should write a mystery in which some kind of maniac is killing off all the mystery writers.
I'd buy it, but not read it.

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"Write a wise saying and your name will live forever." - Anonymous
Posts: 284 | Registered: Tuesday, January 31 2006 08:00
Infiltrator
Member # 7488
Profile #33
quote:
Originally written by Dikiyoba:

Originally by the Mystic:

quote:
What did I ever do to you?
Diprosopus = troll

That should help clear things up, I think.

That explains a lot, yes. Thanks for the warning.
quote:
Originally written by Student of Trinity:

someone should write a mystery in which some kind of maniac is killing off all the mystery writers. He takes out author after author, in hideous ways inspired by their own books.
Interesting idea, but no thanks. I much prefer a movie made a while back called Murder by Death. It's a mystery spoof in which a man challenges 5 detectives to solve a murder that hasn't been committed yet, with $1 million going to the one who solves it.

[ Monday, March 03, 2008 13:14: Message edited by: The Mystic ]

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Either I'm crazy, or everybody else is nuts. And I know I'm not crazy because the little man who lives on my shoulder told me so.
If people don't think there's something wrong with you, there's something wrong with you.
Oh well. Another day, another dementia.
Posts: 558 | Registered: Friday, September 15 2006 07:00
Electric Sheep One
Member # 3431
Profile #34
A real life exercise a bit like that was The Floating Admiral, which was a project of Dorothy L. Sayers. She corralled a dozen or so mystery writers, from Agatha Christie on down, and got them all to write one chapter in a novel, but in sequence. Each author would get to read all the preceding chapters, then write their own contribution, and hand them all on to the next in line. Each author was supposed to 1) figure out from the preceding chapters what was going on, then 2) add a few more clues and developments to move the story as they understood it along.

It's an interesting experiment to read, but a lousy book, because (as they all later confessed) none of the authors was able to get the slightest idea what the preceding authors had had in mind.

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Listen carefully because some of your options may have changed.
Posts: 3335 | Registered: Thursday, September 4 2003 07:00
Nuke and Pave
Member # 24
Profile Homepage #35
quote:
Originally written by Nick Ringer:

...
Let's suppose we wanted to simulate reality. Not like Alorael said - reality with conscious inhabitants, with some degree of free will, advanced enough to mistake for reality. How much computing power would we need to make a simulation - say, a planet? Is it possible to acquire? If so, how long until humanity gets it?

We don't yet have artificial intelligence advanced enough to understand human language. (That would be a requirement for good electronic translators, perfect voice dictation software, and several other applications.) We are getting pretty good at separate elements, such as speech recognition and understanding of grammar, but we still have a long way to go.

I've seen (rather optimitic) predictions that our computers will reach computational capacity of human brain in an average desktop computer around 2015. If it takes a few more years to develop the necessary algorithms, you can expect real artificial intelligence around 2020. If computers keep doubling in computational capacity every two years, a desktop computer will have the computational capacity of a billion people by 2080. However, other aspects of computer architecture (such as storage bandwidth) haven't been growing as quickly, so storage access might become more of a bottleneck than raw processing power.

In summary, by some optimistic predictions I've seen, if current trends in computing continue, we'll be able to create a simulation of the entire human society before the end of this century.

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Be careful with a word, as you would with a sword,
For it too has the power to kill.
However well placed word, unlike a well placed sword,
Can also have the power to heal.
Posts: 2649 | Registered: Wednesday, October 3 2001 07:00
Shock Trooper
Member # 9906
Profile Homepage #36
quote:
quote:
quote:
What did I ever do
Diprosopus = Troll
That explains a lot, yes. Thanks for the warning.
You live with E.T., you should be ready for a Troll.

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Vivan los Drayks! Viva Khyryk! Vivan los Serviles! Vivan los Travokites!
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Posts: 301 | Registered: Tuesday, August 21 2007 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 2984
Profile Homepage #37
Zeviz: We already can, depending on how much detail you put in the model.

Simulating a society is not the same as imitating human consciousness, I'd say.

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The Noble and Ancient Order of Polaris - We're Not Yet Dead.
EncyclopediaBlades ForgeArchivesStatsRSS (This Topic / Forum) • BlogNaNoWriMo
Did-chat thentagoespyet jumund fori is jus, hat onlime gly nertan ne gethen Firyoubbit 'obio.'
Decorum deserves a whole line of my signature, and an entry in your bookmarks.
Posts: 8752 | Registered: Wednesday, May 14 2003 07:00
...b10010b...
Member # 869
Profile Homepage #38
quote:
Originally written by Zeviz:

In summary, by some optimistic predictions I've seen, if current trends in computing continue, we'll be able to create a simulation of the entire human society before the end of this century.
There's a flaw in this argument. The behaviour of a society will depend on all of the technologies it has access to. It's impossible for any computer to contain a perfect simulation of its own effect on society, because to do so it'd have to be able to contain a complete description of itself.

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The Empire Always Loses: This Time For Sure!
Posts: 9973 | Registered: Saturday, March 30 2002 08:00
BANNED
Member # 13806
Profile #39
Perhaps what Zeviz meant to say is that, perhaps we might be able to simulate a society before the influence of such high technology. While such a society might inevitably lead us to create such high technology anyway, we could easily imagine that societal engineers might prevent us from advancing technologically until our advances can be facilitated by the simulation. Of course, none of this answers why we'd be deceived in this fashion, but no Cartesian skeptical hypothesis has ever had to.
Posts: 134 | Registered: Sunday, February 3 2008 08:00
Law Bringer
Member # 2984
Profile Homepage #40
Simulating a society by simulating the conscious thoughts of every single individual in it is not only overkill, but sounds like it could be counterproductive. Statistics work better with masses than with individuals. Yes, too little detail would mean the simulation cannot predict unlikely edge cases (say, Dintiradan or ET unexpectedly gaining world domination), but too much detail would mean it might predict unlikely edge cases which then wouldn't happen after all. Adding too much detail to the model could actually make it less reliable.
Posts: 8752 | Registered: Wednesday, May 14 2003 07:00
Infiltrator
Member # 7488
Profile #41
quote:
Originally written by Arancaytar:

Dintiradan or ET unexpectedly gaining world domination
They'd have to take it from me, and I don't plan on giving it up; I won it years ago, fair and square!

(suddenly notices the map of my conquered world is really the board game Risk)

Oops. Never mind.

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Either I'm crazy, or everybody else is nuts. And I know I'm not crazy because the little man who lives on my shoulder told me so.
If people don't think there's something wrong with you, there's something wrong with you.
Oh well. Another day, another dementia.
Posts: 558 | Registered: Friday, September 15 2006 07:00
BANNED
Member # 13806
Profile #42
The simulation doesn't have to be entirely logarithmic. We could imagine some individual(s) overseeing the simulation, interfering whenever they see obvious signs of growth. (It's not too difficult to keep track of leading scientists within given fields occasionally to track their progress.)
Posts: 134 | Registered: Sunday, February 3 2008 08:00

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