Soylent Green - It's made out of people.

AuthorTopic: Soylent Green - It's made out of people.
Warrior
Member # 4638
Profile #0
RIP Charlton Heston

He was truly a man who exhibited humanity and realized what it takes to be a man. At least in the movies.

You maniacs, you blew it up.

His were some of the best movies ever.

--------------------
Be careful what you pretend to be because you are what you pretend to be.
Posts: 93 | Registered: Tuesday, June 29 2004 07:00
Shaper
Member # 7420
Profile Homepage #1
I'm in a generous mood, so I'll choose to remember him as Moses leading his people on the Exodus from Egypt, rather than the scumbag he was portrayed as in Bowling for Columbine. Or as Ben-Hur defeating the evil romans in an epic chariot race rather than as the President of the NRA. What an interesting person.

--------------------
You lose.
Posts: 2156 | Registered: Thursday, August 24 2006 07:00
Law Bringer
Member # 6785
Profile #2
Funeral services are delayed while they still try to pry an assault rifle from his cold dead hands.
Posts: 4643 | Registered: Friday, February 10 2006 08:00
Warrior
Member # 15187
Profile Homepage #3
I don't know... let me see if I can conjure something good to say about him?

Here's something: For such a poor actor, he did seem to have a remarkable knack at getting movie parts.

Why was that? Was it the same reason John Wayne got parts? Was there something particularly 'manly' about him? It's so hard to tell... .

(I have a feeling I'm going to become really unpopular really soon, on these boards.)
Posts: 178 | Registered: Saturday, March 8 2008 08:00
Canned
Member # 7704
Profile #4
Poor action? at the time these where good action movies.

--------------------
You can jump off a bridge, fire a gun in your mouth, drink poison,or going in to the tiger's pit but you will still end up dead it's a mater of time and how .
Posts: 312 | Registered: Sunday, November 26 2006 08:00
Warrior
Member # 15187
Profile Homepage #5
I suppose at the time they were what the public wanted to see; and the 'special effects' in some of those films didn't hurt. All I was saying was that he was, at most, a mediocre actor.

I am, however, curious as to what made the guy so popular. I understand that ubiquitousness helps... but what made the studios hire him so often? Simply some idea that popularity-of-film = popularity-of-main-actor? Or was there some sort of elusive sense of 'manliness' about him, some sort of I-don't-know-what, pardon my French?

EDIT: I'm in no way suggesting that films such as Planet of the Apes & Soylent Green were 'bad films'. Personally, I liked them. Except for the man's acting.

[ Thursday, April 24, 2008 22:38: Message edited by: Clavicle ]
Posts: 178 | Registered: Saturday, March 8 2008 08:00
Canned
Member # 7704
Profile #6
Mediocre! Sacrebleu! pardis! jean-francois! De par Dieu! comment osez vous me faire cela a MOI qui vous ai logis, blachis et nourris !

French do poorly in english. So don't woory.

In a way actors of the past were better than today's but on the contrary specials effects have evolved in a positive way i think.
To say that these actors where mediocre compared to those of today is to have a bad taste i my opinion.
However taste have changed and what seemed like good acting at the time is now viewed as bad because of different taste.

--------------------
You can jump off a bridge, fire a gun in your mouth, drink poison,or going in to the tiger's pit but you will still end up dead it's a mater of time and how .
Posts: 312 | Registered: Sunday, November 26 2006 08:00
Warrior
Member # 15187
Profile Homepage #7
(Vad? Jag förstår lite om fransk, emedan... nå... jag prater det inte... .)

RE: fx/writing: Hah!

The people's concept of good writing has also changed. Exhibit A: "The Twilight Zone".

Also... While today's special effects are immeasurably more special (obviously) . . . I feel that the studios have come to use them in PLACE of writing . . . which, admittedly, was infrequently very good in American film or TV in the first place, however... overuse of special effects (in games as well as TV & film) kills the work.

Exhibit A in ruination by special effects: the new Dr. Who.

Exhibit A in what can be accomplished with minimal special effects: the films of Ingmar Bergman (RIP).

Anyhow, today's American films (and TV shows) are better, I think, than they were 50 years ago.

I've always found it absolutely wretched that, while the Europeans were experimenting with film, from nearly the very beginning, as an art form: the Americans saw it only as a means of making money.

EDIT: "never any good" to "infrequently very good" -- accuracy is essential! Northern Exposure, after all, was a great show . . . for a while. ...Not to mention the innumerable great American films ever since Kubrick got his hands on the stuff.

[ Thursday, April 24, 2008 23:52: Message edited by: Clavicle ]
Posts: 178 | Registered: Saturday, March 8 2008 08:00