One Planet Down, Eight To Go

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AuthorTopic: One Planet Down, Eight To Go
Agent
Member # 2820
Profile #25
Well, they will only be incorrect in a technical sense. They do not list anything egregiously wrong, I mean, after all Pluto is still there. It has just finally been officially acknowledged as being a dwarf planet rather than a "differently-sized" one.

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Thuryl: I mean, most of us don't go around consuming our own bodily fluids, no matter how delicious they are.
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Alorael: War and violence would end if we all had each other's babies!
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Drakefyre: Those are hideous mangos.
Posts: 1415 | Registered: Thursday, March 27 2003 08:00
Law Bringer
Member # 6785
Profile #26
Do you know of a school that has textbooks that were never not out of date? History textbooks are usually at least 10 to 20 years behind the times. Science ones are even worse. Mathematics are probably the least out of date since new discoveries usually don't apply at that level.
Posts: 4643 | Registered: Friday, February 10 2006 08:00
Law Bringer
Member # 335
Profile Homepage #27
Sure. Sooner or later schools have to invest in new textbooks and then they're usually up to date. That may happen every few decades, but it happens.

—Alorael, who also knows of schools that stay up to date. The textbooks may not always be, but the better teachers point out the problems and fill in the gaps.
Posts: 14579 | Registered: Saturday, December 1 2001 08:00
Shock Trooper
Member # 3898
Profile #28
Well, personally I wish they'd kept the term "pluton". It sounded pretty damn cool.

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~Note : The professional newbie's advice should not be taken seriously, or at all.~
LINKAGE
Posts: 364 | Registered: Saturday, January 17 2004 08:00
Loyal Underling
Member # 13
Profile #29
I wouldn't want a history textbook that went up to the 2004 election. Context, and all that.

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[i]Great Potato[/i]
"Unless by the force of eloquence they mean the force of truth; for if such is their meaning, I admit that I am eloquent." -- Socrates
Posts: 126 | Registered: Thursday, September 27 2001 07:00
FAQSELF
Member # 3
Profile #30
quote:
Originally written by Dallerdin with a custom moniker.:

Well, personally I wish they'd kept the term "pluton". It sounded pretty damn cool.
Actually, many geologists were up in arms over the term "Pluton." In geology, a pluton refers to a large-grained, subsurface igneous body. Astronomers chose the name "Pluton" for small planetlets based solely on the fact that microsoft word's dictionary didn't recognize "pluton" as a valid word, so they thought it was undefined. Oh well.

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A few cats short of a kitten pot pie...

Radioactive cats have 18 half-lives.
Check out a great source for information on Avernum 2, Nethergate, and Subterra: Zeviz's page.
Finally, there's my Geneforge FAQ, Geneforge 2 FAQ, and
Geneforge 3 FAQ.
Posts: 2831 | Registered: Tuesday, September 18 2001 07:00
Agent
Member # 2210
Profile #31
The Greek god of the Underworld no longer has his own hell planet-- Pluto. How ironic.

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Wasting your time and mine looking for a good laugh.

Star Bright, Star Light, Oh I Wish I May, I Wish Might, Wish For One Star Tonight.
Posts: 1084 | Registered: Thursday, November 7 2002 08:00
Law Bringer
Member # 335
Profile Homepage #32
The Roman god, actually, and I'm not sure I see the irony.

—Alorael, who still thinks everything is okay as long as Lake Avernus is around.
Posts: 14579 | Registered: Saturday, December 1 2001 08:00
Law Bringer
Member # 2984
Profile Homepage #33
quote:
Originally written by I'll Steal Your Toast:

The Greek god of the Underworld no longer has his own hell planet-- Pluto. How ironic.
Pluto is Roman, like the other planet names. The Greek god is Hades. Though apparently, Pluto is also derived from Greek (as opposed to Latin), but I'm not sure and that's Kelandon's area of expertise.

Edit: Plus, Alorael was faster.

[ Monday, August 28, 2006 11:58: Message edited by: Drow ]

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My BlogPolarisI eat novels for breakfast.
Polaris is dead, long live Polaris.
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair.
Posts: 8752 | Registered: Wednesday, May 14 2003 07:00
Warrior
Member # 5966
Profile Homepage #34
quote:
Originally written by Randomizer:

Do you know of a school that has textbooks that were never not out of date? History textbooks are usually at least 10 to 20 years behind the times. Science ones are even worse. Mathematics are probably the least out of date since new discoveries usually don't apply at that level.
Actually, my school is lucky enough to have History textbooks that are very recent. My mathematics book however....umm 20 years I think?
Not like it really matters though, because I honestly don't care about that.

--DL
Posts: 91 | Registered: Thursday, June 16 2005 07:00
Off With Their Heads
Member # 4045
Profile Homepage #35
quote:
Originally written by Drow:

Though apparently, Pluto is also derived from Greek (as opposed to Latin), but I'm not sure and that's Kelandon's area of expertise.
I hadn't actually been aware of this. I think, judging from a few sites (including Wikipedia), that Plouton was actually an alternative Greek name for Hades — associated with the word for wealth, ploutos, and thereby associated with the underground, because wealth (gold) is mined from the ground, and therefore associated with the underworld — and Plouton was Latinized as Pluto.

The Romans tried to find counterparts for Greek gods whenever they could. Sometimes they matched up really well (Zeus and Jupiter, who are in fact descended from the same Proto-Indo-European god). Sometimes they kinda didn't (Hephaestus and Vulcan, the former being a smith god and the latter being a volcano god, only vaguely related). Sometimes there just was no equivalent, and the Romans just stole the god outright (Apollo). Apparently the last is what happened with Pluto.

At least, that's my best guess from looking at a few websites.

[ Monday, August 28, 2006 19:18: Message edited by: Kelandon ]

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Posts: 7968 | Registered: Saturday, February 28 2004 08:00
Law Bringer
Member # 6785
Profile #36
Actually I was a bit tired when I originally wrote Pluto was Greek. It was technically right, but in the instance of actually naming planets the Roman names have become the custom even when the Greek names were used earlier.
Posts: 4643 | Registered: Friday, February 10 2006 08:00
Law Bringer
Member # 2984
Profile Homepage #37
So the planets were actually named "Hermes, Aphrodite, Ares" instead of "Mercury, Venus, Mars" once? Now that's something I wasn't aware of...

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Encyclopaedia ErmarianaForum ArchivesForum StatisticsRSS [Topic / Forum]
My BlogPolarisI eat novels for breakfast.
Polaris is dead, long live Polaris.
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair.
Posts: 8752 | Registered: Wednesday, May 14 2003 07:00
...b10010b...
Member # 869
Profile Homepage #38
Yup. It was the ancient Greeks who named the planets in the first place, after all. The word "planet" itself comes from the Greek word for "wanderer", since planets were seen to move around in the sky rather than remaining fixed as the stars do.

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The Empire Always Loses: This Time For Sure!
Posts: 9973 | Registered: Saturday, March 30 2002 08:00
Law Bringer
Member # 6785
Profile #39
If you go to other areas of the world there were other planetary names based on their mythological gods. Venus is Ishtar in Babylonian if I remember it correctly.

What we have now is the Roman Empire influence.
Posts: 4643 | Registered: Friday, February 10 2006 08:00
? Man, ? Amazing
Member # 5755
Profile #40
quote:
Originally written by Nocom:

The Roman god, actually, and I'm not sure I see the irony.

I'm pretty sure what we have here is some of that extremely rare Alanis Morissette irony. Never found in the wild anymore, and just occasionally in print. Kinda like rain on a wedding day, it isn't something we want to keep around.

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quote:
Originally written by Kelandon:

Well, I'm at least pretty sure that Salmon is losing.


Posts: 4114 | Registered: Monday, April 25 2005 07:00

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